A Century of Convalescence
ourpresidents:

President Dwight D. Eisenhower died on March 28, 1969 at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington, D.C.
Eisenhower was buried in his World War II uniform. It consists of trousers and the green “Ike” jacket that he made famous.
Although he was one of the most decorated military men in history, his uniform had only the following medals: Army Distinguished Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Navy Distinguished Service Medal, and the Legion of Merit.
There were four gun salutes during the Eisenhower funeral ceremonies.
More — The Final Post of Dwight D. Eisenhower

ourpresidents:

President Dwight D. Eisenhower died on March 28, 1969 at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Eisenhower was buried in his World War II uniform. It consists of trousers and the green “Ike” jacket that he made famous.

Although he was one of the most decorated military men in history, his uniform had only the following medals: Army Distinguished Service Medal with three oak leaf clusters, Navy Distinguished Service Medal, and the Legion of Merit.

There were four gun salutes during the Eisenhower funeral ceremonies.


More — The Final Post of Dwight D. Eisenhower

Washington, D.C., 1924. GI tunes: “Walter Reed Hospital. Scene in ward where the bed of every soldier is equipped with a set of radio earphones. This is the first hospital in the country to be completely equipped.”

Washington, D.C., 1924. GI tunes: “Walter Reed Hospital. Scene in ward where the bed of every soldier is equipped with a set of radio earphones. This is the first hospital in the country to be completely equipped.”

(Source: shorpy.com)

kriegzombie:

Smoking room at Walter Reed.

kriegzombie:

Smoking room at Walter Reed.

mudwerks:

(via A Hard Right: 1919 | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive)

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. “Scenes at Walter Reed Hospital.” He’ll knock your block off. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

mudwerks:

(via A Hard Right: 1919 | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive)

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. “Scenes at Walter Reed Hospital.” He’ll knock your block off. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative. View full size.

lanzmann:

Major Walter Reed, M.D., (September 13, 1851 – November 22, 1902) was a U.S. Army physician who in 1901 led the team that postulated and confirmed the theory that yellow fever is transmitted by a particular mosquito species, rather than by direct contact. 

lanzmann:

Major Walter Reed, M.D., (September 13, 1851 – November 22, 1902) was a U.S. Army physician who in 1901 led the team that postulated and confirmed the theory that yellow fever is transmitted by a particular mosquito species, rather than by direct contact. 

laphamsquarterly:

ROUNDTABLE:  Helpful Hints for Amputations 


To the south of the house, and just outside of the yard, I noticed a pile of limbs higher than the fence. It was a ghastly sight! Gazing upon these, too often the trophies of the amputating bench, I could have no other feeling, than that the whole scene was one of cruel butchery.


An estimated 60,000 men had a limb (or more) amputated during the course of the Civil War. On the last day of Gettysburg, a look at the grim realities of amputation—and the guidebook field doctors swore by.

laphamsquarterly:

ROUNDTABLE:  Helpful Hints for Amputations 

To the south of the house, and just outside of the yard, I noticed a pile of limbs higher than the fence. It was a ghastly sight! Gazing upon these, too often the trophies of the amputating bench, I could have no other feeling, than that the whole scene was one of cruel butchery.

An estimated 60,000 men had a limb (or more) amputated during the course of the Civil War. On the last day of Gettysburg, a look at the grim realities of amputation—and the guidebook field doctors swore by.
operatory5:

Patient rehabilitation baseball, 1919-1920.

operatory5:

Patient rehabilitation baseball, 1919-1920.

May 1909: Walter Reed General Hospital opens in Washington, D.C., with 10 patients. 
Above: Oldest known photograph of Walter Reed General Hospital, c. 1909.

May 1909: Walter Reed General Hospital opens in Washington, D.C., with 10 patients

Above: Oldest known photograph of Walter Reed General Hospital, c. 1909.

(Source: flickr.com)

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. “Soldiers at Walter Reed.” Displaying their handiwork. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative.

Washington, D.C., circa 1919. “Soldiers at Walter Reed.” Displaying their handiwork. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative.

(Source: shorpy.com)

Maj. Gen. Millard Harmon awarding Doolittle Raider Charles McClure. Walter Reed Hospital, Washington D.C., June 1942. Ralph Morgan, U.S. Air Force.

Maj. Gen. Millard Harmon awarding Doolittle Raider Charles McClure. Walter Reed Hospital, Washington D.C., June 1942. Ralph Morgan, U.S. Air Force.